Terroir & Vineyards

Montgó

D.O.P Cariñena

Viticulture was introduced during the Roman era. At that time the wine was mixed with honey when being drunk. Viticulture was expanded considerably by the monasteries during the Middle Ages. By the 15th Century 50% of the province of Zaragoza was cover with vines. The region was devastated by the arrival of phylloxera in the late 20th Century. Re-plantation was faster than many other Spanish regions and in 1932 the DO was created, thus being one of oldest DO’s in Europe.

The is region famous for its rich juicy fruit with high alcohol from old bush trained vines. Even though the region is called Cariñena and the variety originates here, the variety is in fact not most important planted variety. Garnacha is by far the most dominant variety, along with Tempranillo, Cariñena and Viura.

Landscape and Terroir

Cariñena is located 50 km. southwest of Zaragoza. The river Ebro is to the north and on the Sistema Ibérico to the south. The region is flat and arid. Vineyards are planted generally either planted on the plateau called Campo de Cariñena at 400-500 m. above sea level and planted on the slopes of the Sistema Ibérico. Vines are predominantly planted on brown calcareous soils with excellent drainage, or on area rich in slate and quartzite.

Climate

Extreme continental climate with long, hot summers with over 40˚C and cold winters often below -5˚C. Even though summers are hot, temperature at night drops drastically slowing down the ripening, providing grapes with more extraction. The region is almost desertic with just around 400 mm. of rain per year. The humidity is very low due to the cold dry north western wind, locally called cierzo.


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D.O.P. Jumilla

Vines were planted during the roman era. It was not until the outbreak of phylloxera during the end of the 19th Century that the region expanded. The exceptionally dry climate and the poor soils of Jumilla held back phylloxera from reaching the area. The death of vines throughout Europe resulted in a huge demand for Jumillan wines, leading to rapid expansion of the region during this period. Phylloxera unexpectedly struck the region in 1989, destroying 60% of the regions production. Re-plantation of these vineyards has been slow.

Jumilla is predominantly planted with Monastrell (Mouvedre), along with plantings of Tempranillo, Garnacha Tintorera and the white Macabeo. Most vineyards are dry farmed planted in en Vaso (low bush trained) with just 1500 vines/ha with huge spacing in order to have enough natural precipitation to for vines to survive. This results in one of the world lowest average yields, which is just under 15hl/ha.

Landscape and Terroir

The region is 30 km north of the city Murcia, in the south-eastern corner of Spain. Vineyards are almost equally split between the autonomous community of Murcia and Castilla La Mancha. Vines are planted on wide valley floors at 400-800m above sea level. Soils are extremely poor and brown clayey sand with high content of lime in the sub-soils which help to retain the much needed water during the dry ripening season.

Climate

Continental with long hot summers with temperatures often over 40ºC and cold winters frequently below the freezing point. The region is arid, almost desert like, with under 300mm of annual rain falling almost exclusively in Spring and Autumn, often in violent storms. Thanks to the dry climate, far the most grapes are in fact grown almost without any sprayings, and are therefore in practical grown organically.


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Vino de la Tierra de Castilla

Viticulture was introduced by the ancient Romans 200 BC. It has since been an important part of the local culture in La Mancha. It was not until after the establishment of numerous wineries in the 1940’s that viticulture seriously took off. Ever since it has been an essential part of the local economy in many municipalities. Today the vast majority of the vineyards are planted with the white Airén and the local strain of Tempranillo, also known as Cencibel. A major part of the white Airén is vinified as base wine for the production of Spanish Brandy. Other main varieties include Macabeo, Verdejo, Garnacha, Bobal, as well as a few international varieties. Around 50% of all the plantings are dry farmed and low bush trained, yielding exceptionally low yields with concentrated fruit.

Landscape and Terroir

Located on the southern part of the Spanish plateau, covering all municipalities in Castile La Mancha. Vineyards cover almost half of Spain’s vineyard, more than 400,000 ha, hence being the largest wine region in the world. Vines are planted on flatlands and gentle slopes between 500 to 1000 meter above sea level. Soils vary enormously, but generally vines are planted on the poorest soil with low water holding capacity, where other crops cannot grow. This restricts yields and gives concentrated grapes.

Climate

Extreme continental with long hot summer, temperatures frequently over 45ºC, and cold winters with temperatures as low as -15ºC. Huge diurnal temperature variation, providing cool nights which helps to fixate colour and aroma, as well as retain natural acidity in the grapes. With only 300-400mm of annual precipitation, mainly falling in winter, which means that drought is an annual worry and low density bush vines is still a norm to supply just enough water for vines to survive.


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